The Rites Of The Catholic Church


RITES OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN THE WEST
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LATIN RITE
CHURCH AREA of PRACTICE LANGUAGE of LITURGY
ROMAN Worldwide Latin & Vernacular
AMBROSIAN Italy - Milan Archdiocese Latin & Vernacular
MOZARABIC
(Iberian)
Spain - Toledo Use Latin & Vernacular
Portugal - Bragan Use Latin & Vernacular


Also, as a matter of record there are a number of other "so-called rites" known as 'historic rites of religious orders', which are not truly rites per se, but are mainly variations of the Latin Rite to which they belong. These are:
Carthusian Rite Liturgy
Cistercian Rite Liturgy
Dominican Rite Liturgy
Premonstratensian Rite liturgy
Franciscan Rite Liturgy
Benedictine Rite Liturgy
Servite Rite Liturgy
Carmelite of the Holy Sepulcre Rite liturgy
In recent years some Anglican clergy with their entire congregations have re-united with The Catholic Church. The Holy See has allowed an Anglican Use Liturgy to be celebrated by former Anglican ministers who become Catholics. The Anglican Use Liturgy consists of the Book of Common Prayers of the Anglican Liturgy with some adaptations from the Ordo of Pope Paul VI (the Revised Roman Liturgy).

N.B.   Up until the end of the 19th century the Latin Rite of the Western Church comprised two other "Church Liturgies", which are now extinct, namely:
The Gallican (Frankish), centered mainly in France & central Europe, with its Lyonaise Use Liturgy, and:
The Celtic (British), centered mainly in England, with its Sarum Use Liturgy.
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RITES OF THE EASTERN CATHOLIC CHURCH
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ALEXANDRIAN RITE  ( Liturgy of St. Mark )
CHURCH AREA of PRACTICE LANGUAGE of LITURGY
COPTIC Egypt & Near East Syriac & Arabic or Coptic
ETHIOPIAN Ethiopia & Somalia Geez & Arabic


ANTIOCHENE RITE  ( Liturgy of St. James )
CHURCH AREA of PRACTICE LANGUAGE of LITURGY
SYRIAN Near & Middle East Syriac & Arabic
MARONITE Middle East & Diaspora Syriac & Vernacular
MALANKARESE India Syriac


ARMENIAN RITE  ( Greek Liturgy of St.Basil )
CHURCH AREA of PRACTICE LANGUAGE of LITURGY
ARMENIAN Near East & Diaspora Greek & Armenian


CHALDEAN RITE  ( Derived from Antiochene Rite )
CHURCH AREA of PRACTICE LANGUAGE of LITURGY
CHALDEAN Near & Middle East Syriac & Arabic
Syro-Malabarese India Syriac & Malayan


BYZANTINE RITE  ( Liturgy of St. James, St. Basil & Others )
Please note that the Byzantine Rite is also known as "The Constantinopolitan Rite"
CHURCH AREA of PRACTICE LANGUAGE of LITURGY
ALBANIAN ALBANIA Albanian & Greek
BELARUSSIAN BELARUS Old Slavonic
BULGARIAN BULGARIA Old Slavonic
CZECH* Czech Republic Old Slavonic & Vernacular
GEORGIAN Georgia & Asia Minor Georgian & Greek
GREEK Greece & Diaspora Greek & Vernacular
HUNGARIAN Hungary & USA Greek & Vernacular
ITALO-ALBANIAN East & South ITALY Greek & Vernacular
KRIZEVCI** Croatia & former Yugoslavia Old Slavonic & Vernacular
MELKITE Greece & Diaspora Greek & Vernacular
ROMANIAN Romania & USA Greek & Vernacular
RUSSIAN Russia & Diaspora Old Slavonic
RUTHENIAN Ukrainia & USA Old Slavonic
SLOVACKIAN Slovackia Old Slavonic
UKRAINIAN Ukrainia & Diaspora Old Slavonic & Vernacular

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*  The Apostolic Exarchate for Catholics of Byzantine Rite in the Czech Republic was established by Pope John Paul II in his Bull of March 13, 1996.

**  The first Catholics of the Byzantine rite in what was Yugoslavia were Serbians living in Croatian territory under Hungarian control in the early 17th century. In 1611 they were given a bishop, who was officially the Byzantine vicar of the Latin Bishop of Zagreb. His headquarters was at March monastery, which became a center of efforts to bring Serbian Orthodox into communion with Rome. After a period of tension with the local Latin bishops, the Serbs in Croatia were given their own diocesan bishop by Pope Pius VI on 17 June 1777, with his See at Krizevci. He was made suffragan at first to the Primate of Hungary, and later (1853) to the Latin Archbishop of Zagreb. The diocese of Krizevci was extended to embrace all the Byzantine Catholics in then-Yugoslavia when this new country was founded after World War I. Thus the diocese included 5 distinct groups: Croatians, Ruthenians who had emigrated from Slovakia around 1750, Ukranians who emigrated from Galicia in about 1900, Macedonians in the south of the country who became Catholic because of 19th c. missionary activity (who now have their own Apostolic activity), and a few Romanians in what was called the Yugoslavian Banat. Interestingly, Blessed Aloysius Cardinal Stepinac, the Archbishop of Zagreb tried to save Serb converts to the Church from the murderous pro-Nazi Croatian Ushtashi. The present Bishop of Krizevci for about 50,000 Byzantine Catholics in former Yugoslavia is Bishop Slavomir Mkilovs who was appointed in 1983 and resides in Zagreb, capital of Croatia.



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Last revision or update 10/16/2006